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Fun food prep: dinky dinosaur yogurt bites

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Fun food prep...

There's only one thing better than frozen vanilla yogurt bites - frozen vanilla yogurt bites shaped liked dinky dinosaurs! Aside from making a tasty alternative to sugar sweetened ice-cream (little'uns can suck on them like lollies!), these cute little creatures are also a fantastic way to make 'healthier' food more fun for minors - we created ours using a chocolate mould, plain yogurt and a dash of vanilla! 


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Child nutrition: why children should never be forced to clear their plate

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Food for thought: forcing children to clear their plate can result in more than just food refusal...

Although a fear of food waste (and fussy eaters failing to tuck into 'enough' food!) may trigger the temptation to force children to clear their plate, this avoidable and inappropriate action can not only affect their (natural) ability to sense their satiety signals (a preventable problem that can increase their predisposition to piling on the pounds as they learn to continue to eat past the point of fullness from an early age), but it can also leave them feeling uncomfortably full - a form of discomfort that can raise the risk of food refusal as a result of creating a negative eating experience and food associations. 

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Child nutrition: three fundamental facts to remember when resorting to canned, dried and frozen fruit and veg...

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Although a fear of food waste frequently puts many parents off of purchasing fresh fruit and vegetables (particularly if their tots are picky!), this prevalent problem can often be prevented by opting for canned, frozen and dried varieties. 

In order to ensure that your tot tucks into healthier sources, here are three fundamental facts to remember when resorting to these cost effective choices...

1.Canned vegetables can contain copious amounts of salt - always opt for no added salt varieties e.g.in plain water, in order to reduce the risk of infants exceeding their recommended intake.

2.Canned fruit can contain a substantial amount of sugar (the 'free' type that tots need to eat less of) in the form of syrup - a reason why favouring fruit in its natural juice is recommended. 

3.Dried fruits such as dates, apricots and raisins contain a concentrated source of sugar that can damage teeth - always offer this particular variety at mealtimes (as opposed to as a snack between meals) to …

Child health: why promoting body diversity from an early age is equally as essential as promoting body positivity...

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Are you a parent who promotes body positivity and diversity? 

Although promoting a positive body image is paramount for improving an infant's perception of their own physique, taking the time to promote body diversity - particularly from an early age - is equally as essential. This can not only strengthen a child's self-esteem and self-acceptance, but it can also reduce the prevalence of weight-related bullying by teaching tots' that it's 'normal' and natural for bodies to come in all shapes and sizes.

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Child nutrition - do you take advantage of the free fruit for kids scheme?

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Do you take advantage of the free fruit for kids scheme?

Although shopping for food with tots' in toe may seem like a stressful struggle (particularly if they're prone to public tears and tantrums!), supermarkets provide the perfect opportunity to increase an infant's exposure to 'feared' and unfamiliar foods in an environment where they won't feel pressured to try them. 
If your youngster is fussy about fruit, positively pointing out the free fruit for kids scheme whilst encouraging (not pressuring!) them to take a look, touch and/or choose a different source to try each time that you take a trip to the shops is a fantastic way to ignite an interest in a food that's more feared, than favoured - it's also great for keeping them occupied whilst you grab your groceries! 

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Parenting: why taming toddler tears and tantrums with sweet treats can lead to emotional eating in later life...

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Food for thought: a life-long emotional connection to food often originates during early childhood when sensory stimulating food sources are commonly used for non-nutritional reasons...

Although parents who persistently soothe and suppress their tot's sadness with sweet treats may temporarily tame their tears and tantrums, this inappropriate action also promotes the psychological perception that palatable foods can provide a sense of security. This not only implies that a form of comfort can be found in favourable food sources, but it also increases the incidence of emotional eating in adolescence and adulthood as children continue to seek a form of comfort (the comfort that they've learnt to associate with appealing foods) in sweet sources during times of emotional stress and distress.

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Child health: how parental attitude towards food can affect children...

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Fast food for thought...

A child's attitude towards food frequently mimics that of their parents or carer - a reason why modelling healthier eating habits, forbidding food restriction and resembling a positive role model (etc!) plays such a predominant part in helping to prevent children from developing unhealthy habits, negative nutrition associations (think branding specific food sources as 'bad'), fussy food eating and an irrational relationship with food in later life.

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